denmark

Denmark, officially the Kingdom of Denmark, is a sovereign state in Northern Europe, with two additional overseas constituent countries also forming integral parts of the kingdom; the Faroe Islands in the North Atlantic and Greenland in North...

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Denmark, officially the Kingdom of Denmark, is a sovereign state in Northern Europe, with two additional overseas constituent countries also forming integral parts of the kingdom; the Faroe Islands in the North Atlantic and Greenland in North America. Denmark proper is the southernmost of the Nordic countries, located southwest of Sweden, with which it is connected by the Øresund Bridge, and south of Norway, and bordered to the south by Germany. The country consists of a large peninsula, Jutland, and many islands, most notably Zealand, Funen, Lolland, Falster and Bornholm, as well as hundreds of minor islands often referred to as the Danish Archipelago.

The Kingdom of Denmark is a constitutional monarchy organised in the form of a parliamentary democracy, with its seat of government in the capital city of Copenhagen. The kingdom is unitary, with powers to manage internal affairs being devolved from the central government to Greenland and the Faroe Islands; this polity is referred to as the rigsfællesskab. Denmark proper is the hegemonial area, where judicial, executive, and legislative power reside. The Faroe Islands are defined to be a community of people within the kingdom, and the Greenlandic people are defined as a separate people with the right to self-determination. One of the results of this arrangement is that Denmark became a member of the European Union in 1973, but both Greenland and the Faroe Islands have opted to remain outside of the EU.

Originally the home of the Vikings, Norse seafaring explorers who invaded and settled in many parts of Europe and Russia, Denmark emerged as a unified kingdom in the Middle Ages. Denmark's later history has particularly been influenced by its geographical location between the North and Baltic seas. This meant that it was between Sweden and Germany and thus at the center of the mutual struggle for control of the Baltic Sea; before the digging of the Kiel Canal, water passage to the Baltic Sea was possible only through the three channels known as the Danish straits. Denmark was long in disputes with Sweden over control of Skånelandene and Norway, and in disputes with the Hanseatic League over the duchies of Schleswig and Holstein. Eventually Denmark lost the conflicts and ended up ceding first Skånelandene to Sweden and later Schleswig-Holstein to the German Empire. Denmark obtained Greenland and the Faroe Islands in 1814 after the dissolution of a personal union with Norway, although the Danish monarchy, which had ruled over both Norway and Denmark, had been in possession of the colonies since the fourteenth century.

some cities

experiences (3)

have you spent time in denmark? share your experiences

9

denmark - anonymous' reflections after years there in their 20s

posted by anonymous on 09/30/13.

I'm married to a Dane. We met on the internet and I visited him as a friend before falling in love with the man and the country. He visited me in the United States, and we had a discussion when we decided to get married that we would live in Denmark. He had no desire to move from his home town and I was open to living elsewhere (besides the fact that I absolutely adore the place we live).

I live in South Western Denmark, or Sydjylland. It's very different from Copenhagen, which is a very international city and known for its multiculturalism. Where I live the population is predominantly Danish; and it's harder to get by as an immigrant here (though not impossible). The land out here is quite beautiful though; I live between the sea and the countryside, and just south of a National park, so there's a lot of nature and greenery around me. It's a very pretty part of the country.

The people here are stoic and somewhat simple in their lifestyles (They're traditionally farmers or fishermen and used to hard, physical work). Once you get to know them, though, people here are very welcoming and friendly. My mother in law grew up on a farm, and has this very no-nonsense way about her,...

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6

copenhagen, denmark - anonymous' reflections after years there in their teens

posted by anonymous on 10/22/13.

How much time have you spent in Denmark?

I'm now living my 8th year in Denmark, periods 2000 - 2005 & 2011 - present. When living in the states my family visited usually twice a year.

How old were you when you came to Denmark? Where were you before?

I was born in DK, moved to the states straight after, then again from the age of 7 to 12, and again from 18 to present. I lived in Northern California otherwise.

What brought you to Denmark? What made you choose Denmark over any other place you could've gone?

Well when I lived with my family then it wasn't really a choice I my part but we moved to DK for family. After graduating high school I moved for education, but I had wanted to move back to DK since freshmen/sophomore year but wasn't aloud to due to my parents wanting me to graduate high school first (which evidently was worth jack-shit over here and ended up taking the IB (another secondary education)). I chose DK because I spoke the language pretty well, was a Danish citizen, but also I prefer the social aspects especially in the teenage - young adult ages, I feel that it is a lot more open and responsibility is given to people at a much younger age, already...

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1

copenhagen, denmark - anonymous' thoughts after months there in their 20s

posted by anonymous on 10/24/13.

How much time have you spent in Copenhagen?

I was there for 6 months.

How old were you when you came to Copenhagen? Where were you before?

I was living in the United States at the time. I was 23 at the time.

What brought you to Copenhagen?

Ostensibly I was there to take some classes to further my MBA. In reality it was because I wanted to travel to a different continent and the opportunity presented itself.

Describe Copenhagen and your impressions of it.

Copenhagen was the city. I was in the Vesterbro neighborhood. It was pretty rough at the time. I remember it being advertised in the school pamphlet as "The Real Copenhagen". It was a predominantly Muslim neighborhood - many an Iraqi flag were flown after a major soccer win. The neighborhood was somewhat lovingly referred to as "Kebab-ville" and lived up to the billing - the foreign food in the area was some of the best I've had even now in my life. The transportation was great. Even in one of the poorer neighborhoods, the dive bars and restaurants were much more expensive than I was used to.

How does the city you lived in compare to other cities in Denmark?

Within Denmark, it was much easier to be an English...

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demographics

population

5,543,453 (July 2012 est.)

ethnic groups

Scandinavian, Inuit, Faroese, German, Turkish, Iranian, Somali

languages

Danish, Faroese, Greenlandic (an Inuit dialect), German (small minority)

religions

Evangelical Lutheran (official) 95%, other Christian (includes Protestant and Roman Catholic) 3%, Muslim 2%

age structure

0-14: 0-14 years: 17.4% (male 494,967/ female 469,918)

15-64: 15-64 years: 65% (male 1,806,653/ female 1,796,576)

65+: 65 years and over: 17.6% (male 433,401/ female 541,938) (2012 est.)

urbanization

87% of total population (2010)

life expectancy

78.78 years

obesity rate

11.4% (2006)

literacy rate

99%

average years of education

17 years

economics

cost of living

8/10 (high)

economic overview

This thoroughly modern market economy features a high-tech agricultural sector, state-of-the-art industry with world-leading firms in pharmaceuticals, maritime shipping and...

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This thoroughly modern market economy features a high-tech agricultural sector, state-of-the-art industry with world-leading firms in pharmaceuticals, maritime shipping and renewable energy, and a high dependence on foreign trade. Denmark is a member of the European Union (EU); Danish legislation and regulations conform to EU standards on almost all issues. Danes enjoy among the highest standards of living in the world and the Danish economy is characterized by extensive government welfare measures and an equitable distribution of income. Denmark is a net exporter of food and energy and enjoys a comfortable balance of payments surplus but depends on imports of raw materials for the manufacturing sector. Within the EU, Denmark is among the strongest supporters of trade liberalization. After a long consumption-driven upswing, Denmark's economy began slowing in 2007 with the end of a housing boom. Housing prices dropped markedly in 2008-09 and, following a short respite in 2010, continued to decline in 2011 though at a slower pace. The global financial crisis has exacerbated this cyclical slowdown through increased borrowing costs and lower export demand, consumer confidence, and investment. The global financial crises cut Danish real GDP by 0.8% in 2008 and 5.8% in 2009. Denmark made a modest recovery in 2010 with real GDP growth of 1.3%, in part because of increased government spending; however, the country experienced a technical recession in late 2010-early 2011. Historically low levels of unemployment rose sharply with the recession and have remained at about 6% in 2010-11, based on the national measure, about two-thirds average EU unemployment. An impending decline in the ratio of workers to retirees will be a major long-term issue. Denmark maintained a healthy budget surplus for many years up to 2008, but the budget balance swung into deficit in 2009. In spite of the deficits, the new coalition government plans to deliver a modest stimulus to the economy in 2012. Nonetheless, Denmark's fiscal position remains among the strongest in the EU at 46.5% of GDP in 2011. Despite previously meeting the criteria to join the European Economic and Monetary Union (EMU), so far Denmark has decided not to join, although the Danish krone remains pegged to the euro. Denmark held the EU presidency during the first half of 2012; priorities included promoting a responsible, dynamic, green, and safe Europe, while working to steer Europe out of its euro zone economic crisis.

major industries

iron, steel, nonferrous metals, chemicals, food processing, machinery and transportation equipment, textiles and clothing, electronics, construction, furniture and other...

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iron, steel, nonferrous metals, chemicals, food processing, machinery and transportation equipment, textiles and clothing, electronics, construction, furniture and other wood products, shipbuilding and refurbishment, windmills, pharmaceuticals, medical equipment

gdp per capita

$37,000 (2011 est.)

gdp growth rate

0.8% (2011 est.)

gdp composition by sector

agriculture: 1.3% industry: 22.3% services: 76.5% (2011 est.)

unemployment rate

6.1% (2011 est.)

population below poverty line

13.4% (2011)

gini index

24.8 (2011 est.) country comparison to the world: 133 24.7 (1992)